All posts tagged: Power Flows


Why Germany needs a European Energiewende

The European Union is currently negotiating its 2030 energy goals. So far, the German Energiewende has been criticized for being too inward-looking. Yet it is in Germany’s immediate interest to embrace the European dimension. Rebecca Bertram looks at why Germany needs a European Energiewende.

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The end of the Energiewende is back

Yet again, an expert – this time, a German – says Germany’s energy transition cannot succeed. He has a surprising insight for Energiewende proponents: the sun doesn’t always shine and the wind doesn’t always blow. How could we have missed that? Craig Morris takes a look.

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France can’t meet its own power demand

As expected, France was heavily dependent on power imports during the first cold spell of this winter. Yet, most of the country’s reactors are back online. The US is now also investigating 17 reactors with parts from France that could also be defective. Craig Morris has the details.

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Success of EU foreign policy hinges on climate and energy security

Europe’s global strategic interests have become inseparable from managing climate risk and the global Energy Transition, write Luca Bergamaschi, Nick Mabey, Jonathan Gaventa and Camilla Born of the independent climate and energy think tank E3G. In a new report, EU foreign policy in a changing climate, they set out how Europe can make these themes a central thread in its foreign policy.

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Regional Cooperation: A Solution to the European Renewables deadlock?

German town Haren and the Dutch town Emmen try to build a regional, decentralised, mostly communal cross-border energy system. But there are several challenges that both municipalities in Emmen and Haren are facing which could be solved by a more coherent policy framework on the European level. Kathrin Glastra (Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung EU) and Anna Leidreiter (World Future Council) have a look.

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French nuclear under pressure – from German renewables?

In late May, strikes reduced nuclear power production in France. Yet even more plants were offline a few weeks earlier without any strikes at all. German and European renewable electricity may have been one reason why France switched off so many nuclear plants that weekend. Craig Morris takes a look.

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