All posts tagged: Wind


Going green in South East Asia

In 2015, at an Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) meeting, the governments of Southeast Asia announced a series of targets to increase the region’s share of renewables. Nicholas Newman takes a look at the progress made and remaining roadblocks.

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Auctions didn’t make wind power cheaper, study finds

Wind power prices have plummeted in recent years since Germany switched to auctions. Now, a study has found what readers of this blog already knew: the prices only look low because they are reported as though future electricity were already being generated today. Craig Morris explains.

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India’s energy transition: potential and prospects

Touted as the world’s third largest emitter of greenhouse gas, India is steadily on its way to transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. The targets that the country has set itself are closer to being achieved and even surpassed. Sadia Sohail explains the newest study on India’s energy policy.

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Southeast Asia: hotspot for renewables or dumping ground for coal?

In the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), renewables contributed 8% to final energy consumption in 2014. Since then, the share renewable energy has only slightly increased whereas fossil fuel-powered generation is the main source for new power plants. Lars Blume and Nguyen Thi Hang illustrate why momentum in Southeast Asia is changing.

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Cape Town in crisis

Cape Town is dealing with one of the biggest climate change-linked water crises to face a modern city. This should serve as our wake-up call: we must transition to a new, shared way of organising around increasingly stretched resources, writes Leonie Joubert.

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Negative power prices: good or bad?

The New York Times says they are “positive for energy users.” But Germany’s newspapers Handelsblatt and Der Spiegel say that Germans are paying neighboring countries to take excess power off their hands. Who is right? Craig Morris investigates.

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