All posts tagged: Uruguay


Latin America pursues electromobility

The energy transition isn’t just about electricity – transportation is also key. But many countries are too focused on renewable energy, and ignore public transport and electromobility. Emilio Godoy takes a broad look at what Latin American countries are doing to drive down emissions.

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Has nuclear power been abandoned in Latin America?

Nuclear power is not a prevalent source of energy in Latin America. Currently, there are just seven nuclear power reactors in operation, producing just 2.2% of total energy consumption in Latin America: three in Argentina, two in Brazil and two in Mexico. However, it seems that nuclear power around the Western hemisphere is driven by a desire to find alternatives to low fossil fuel prices and CO2 emissions altogether. Are we talking about a nuclear revival? Lilian Sol Cueva takes a look.

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Emerging economies surge forward with renewables

Why is renewable energy adoption in the world’s emerging economies growing nearly twice as fast than in industrialized nations? Laurie Guevara-Stone summarizes a hopeful report that shows that renewables are already the cheapest source of electricity in a number of emerging markets today, helping to bring affordable and sustainable electricity to everybody.

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Energy efficiency in Latin America, the missing piece

Energy efficiency measures are low hanging fruits to achieve more sustainable energy systems. Still, the topic is not very high on the political agenda in Latin America. A new study compares progress made by the countries in the region and names best practices. Sandra Guzman summarizes the findings.

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Developing and Emerging Countries take the Lead

Paris-based renewables organization REN21 has published the latest edition of its annual Global Status Report. The 2014 edition finds that, while Europe and North America have become roller coaster markets for renewables, developing and emerging countries have picked up the slack and could be the future leaders. Craig Morris investigates.

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