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The French Experiment

On Wednesday, France’s new President Emmanuel Macron appointed his cabinet – to great acclaim. The direction of the country’s energy transition remains unclear, however. Craig Morris investigates (and secretly hopes for a Sixth Republic).

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U.S. utilities try new tactics to discourage solar, but still aren’t getting what they want

In the US, utilities are trying to increase charges for their customers – disproportionately affecting those who use solar. Such changes can be catastrophic for the solar market. But very little utility-sponsored legislation has been successful, and some states are even taking proactive steps to develop community solar. Christian Roselund of PV magazine explains.

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Pura Vida! Driving Smart Electric Mobility in Costa Rica

Costa Rica is known for its renewable-friendly policies and ambitious goals to lower emissions. But as Bjørn Utgård and Mónica Araya explain, electric mobility is a key part of reducing greenhouse gases. Public transit, affordable electric vehicles and infrastructure will all be crucial for Costa Rica’s energy transition.


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The US (and Australian) nuclear camp critiques studies for 100% renewables. Without reading them.

Over the past year, the Anglo world has become interested in nuclear as a complement for wind and solar towards “deep decarbonization,” or a (nearly) 100% carbon-free supply of energy or possibly just electricity. Today, Craig Morris reviews a few papers by Americans and Australians and advises them to tackle the best European studies for 100% renewables head-on, not ignore them.

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“Too much renewables” is a political decision

While Americans chose to curtail wind and solar rather than conventional energy, the Germans say baseload plants (coal and nuclear) are the problem. That’s because the matter isn’t simply technical, though it is described as such. It’s mainly political. Craig Morris explains.

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